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Posts Tagged ‘UNC Charlotte’

I don’t know nothin’ ‘bout PRCs!

Now that he knew, it was his job to make sure his people did not perish due to lack of knowledge. Hosea 4:6

Now that he knows, he can make sure that his people do not perish for lack of knowledge. (Hosea 4:6)

by Jacqueline Hawkins

Church-going, pro-life folks like us know the lingo.  We have counseled abortion-minded women in front of the local abortion clinic.  We have helped with baby bottle drives.  We have helped with diaper drives.

So we often forget that people in the mainstream have no clue that pregnancy resource centers (PRCs) exist.  Planned Parenthood have huge budgets for marketing death, some of it paid for by our taxes.  PRC budgets are much more modest.

At UNC Charlotte, a young man had been looking at the picture thoughtfully. He said, “I understand what you guys are saying, but if me and my girlfriend (sic) get pregnant, what are we supposed to do?”

Let’s set aside the fact that this young man and his girlfriend should be waiting for marriage.  Let’s also set aside the implied claim of entitlement to sex without responsibility.

I asked him if he had ever heard of a pregnancy resource center, as I pointed to the PRC hotline number on one of our signs.  He had never heard of such a thing.  A little surprised by this, I explained to him about all the services PRCs offer.  He was truly thankful to hear about this option for him, his girlfriend, and his future children, should the need arise.

I told him that now that he is aware of it, he has new responsibilities.  Having seen abortion photos, he knows what abortion does to pre-born children. He knows about life-affirming alternatives.  He knows abortion is not good enough for those he cares about.

Armed with facts, he can direct his family and friends to life-affirming options.  He can make sure that his people do not perish for lack of knowledge.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

A mother’s loss

We must consider the feelings of those who are post-abortive, but also the lives of those who are pre-abortive (and especially their children).

We must consider the feelings of those who are post-abortive, but also the lives of those who are pre-abortive (and especially their children).

by Jacqueline Hawkins

“I was raped and had an abortion at 14, and these pictures traumatize me,” a young woman at UNC Charlotte told me, with anger in her eyes and an edge to her quiet voice.  She had been standing with a sizable group of angry (but polite) students who did not like our message.  When the group dispersed, she stayed to speak with me.

There was really only one thing I could or wanted to say to her: “I’m so sorry for what you’ve gone through and for the loss of your child.”

She wasn’t visibly shocked, but I could tell that she wasn’t expecting my response.  I proceeded to gently tell her that in this whole abortion mess we have to weigh preserving the feelings of those who were touched by abortion in the past with the lives that could and would be saved today and in the future.

In return she told me that she wasn’t sorry or regretted her abortion. “Not every woman regrets her abortion,” she insisted quietly.

Even if that is the case, I told her, the abortion doesn’t make women unpregnant, it makes them mothers of dead children.  Parents who have lost children, whether by abortion or car accident or miscarriage, should have sympathy and condolences for their loss.

Seeing that she was at least somewhat receptive to what I was saying, I gently told her that although people may not regret their abortions early on, that regret could still emerge later on.  Having other children, not being able to have children, or realizing certain landmarks for a dead child (such as birthdays) often sparks deep regret in post-abortive parents.

It is worth every effort to stop abortions, both for the sake of the children and for the sake of the parents.

When she left, she didn’t look happy, but she seemed satisfied with the response I gave her.  Please pray for her and other post-abortive parents.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Gems at University of North Carolina Charlotte, Part 2

CBR volunteer Laurice Baddour stands with a Rwandan man in front of the Rwandan genocide picture.  He gave the display two thumbs up!

CBR volunteer Laurice Baddour stands with a Rwandan man in front of the Rwandan genocide picture.  He gave the display two thumbs up!

Here are some more beautiful gems from GAP at UNC Charlotte (UNCC).  This is a continuation of Gems at UNC Charlotte, Part 1.

Grandma’s reaction.  An outraged young man shouted, “I want verification of these photos!” We gave him our verification documents. “Oh, that doesn’t count; that information is not from a local doctor!!!” he concluded.  In response, a wise older woman told Jane,  “What idiocy.  That young man is coming from guilt.  Why else all this anger?  I am taking pictures of your photos to show my 18-year-old grandson before he goes off to college.  As Christians, we don’t believe in abortion, but you can hear the word all you want, but hearing is nothing like seeing!  This is real!!”

Making Planned Parenthood decent.  After the young woman signaled her support for abortion at our poll table, Jane engaged her in conversation.  At the end, she concluded, “Let’s just keep PP open on the side that does women’s health care and close down the abortion side!”  Hey, if they just do mammograms, pap smears and adoption referrals, that’s fine by us!

22 years in and she can’t imagine …  “My parents wanted me to abort my baby, but I just couldn’t!”  She recounted how it changed her, made her mature, and made her sacrifice.  Now she has a 22-year-old son and cannot imagine her life without him. “I would love to be here and tell these students that if I can be a teenage mom, anyone can be.  Yes, it made me grow up faster than I wanted, but I wouldn’t trade that experience for anything.  I want so much to tell them not to be afraid.”

A helping hand sees the hope.  Another student chimed in that he has volunteered at a nearby pregnancy resource center.  He has seen many college-age students face the challenge of an unplanned pregnancy with hope and determination, once they hear about the options, services, and programs that can help.  He wanted to get involved with the student group to bring more displays and information to the campus.

Don’t tell them what to do…just make them not want to do it…  A 30-something  man considered abortion evil, but a necessary evil.  He considered killing anything evil but sometimes it had to be done.  He didn’t like our shock tactics.  Jackie explained that our goal is to change public opinion so that abortion was an unthinkable evil for everyone.  The light bulb went off in his head and he suddenly liked what we were doing.  He came from the standpoint that we couldn’t tell people what to do in the laws, but we could inform them so that even if it was legal they wouldn’t want to do it.  [Note: Just to be clear, we want laws against abortion.  As it is with slavery, we want abortion to be unthinkable for civilized people, but we still need to laws that will restrain uncivilized people.]

From pro-abortion to sign me up!  CBR volunteer Laurice Baddour asked a young woman if she was pro-abortion or pro-life.  She responded that she was pro-abortion, however she was willing to listen.  After speaking for no more than 15 minutes, the young woman thoughtfully admitted that she was now pro-life.  Laurice wanted to push the envelope.  Would the young want to get her new pro-life feet wet in the pro-life club on campus?  YES!  And with that Laurice signed her up.  In 15 minutes, a pro-abortion-turned-pro-life student committed to being a pro-life on Campus activist.  [Note:  Not all students who pledge to pro-life activism actually follow through with their commitment.  That is why we are thankful for you, because you make our work possible, not with your words, but with your deeds.  Thank you!]

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Gems at University of North Carolina Charlotte, Part 1

With one press of a button, her social media friends will see the pictures.  Not only that, but probably their friends and their friends’ friends.

With one press of a button, her social media friends will see the pictures.  Not only that, but probably their friends and their friends’ friends.

The University of North Carolina was a deceptively quiet school. There were no huge protest groups and things seemed pretty uneventful.

The one exception was the barricade jumper who spray-painted one of our signs.  (He has since been forced by the Court to pay restitution to CBR.)

We had many, many positive interactions on this campus.  So many, we can’t cover them all in one post!  Here is Part 1.

A day when we won’t come back.  “I met you 6 years ago.  I am glad you guys came back, but I would be glad if you don’t come back again.  That would mean we have ended abortion!” said a young man in a wheelchair with considerable and permanent physical disabilities.

Power of the pictures.  Cody was amazed.  “Wow!  This just amplifies what I believe.  It makes it so much more important, you know, and like, brings it from the back of my mind to the forefront.  Thank you!”

Understanding casual murder.  Angie told Jane that she worked in a hospital lab with “products of conception”—slides made from babies dead in the womb from natural causes.  As she puffed on a cigarette, she lamented, “Seeing this when it’s a casual ‘choice’ is really different.  This is so sad.”

Seeing is believing is outlawing.  Bobby told us, “You see it and it really becomes real.  It makes you think maybe it should not be legal for sure.  So different than I thought.”

If they can get the milk, …  A UNCC administrator came by the display.  She said, “I marched with my parents in the 70’s and I can hardly believe we are still fighting this battle.  My 27-year-old son told me recently, ‘Mom, why do we guys need to get married when the girls give us what we want for free?’  And I say, ‘girls, wake up!’”

She can do anything!  “I was pregnant and thought about abortion for a second.  It did cross my mind.  And I was having some problems with my fiancé at the time, so I talked to my mom.  She said, ‘You can’t do that. You won’t be able to live with yourself.’  So I didn’t.  I stayed in school and had my baby, and things are great with my fiancé now.   Having a baby while in college is not easy, but now I feel like I can do anything.”

More to come.  Stay tuned for Part 2.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

If not genocide, what else would we call it?

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At the UNC Charlotte UNCC), Dr. John Cox, Associate Professor of International Studies, came out to cast aspersions on our scholarship and our character (to put it mildly).  He claimed that abortion is not genocide, staking his claim on the 1948 United Nations (UN) Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide.

When I brought up UN Resolution 96, adopted in 1946, Dr. Cox angrily denied that the UN ever defined genocide outside the 1948 Convention.  Wrong.  In fact, Resolution 96 stated

Genocide is a denial of the right of existence of entire human groups, as homicide is the denial of the right to live of individual human beings; such denial of the right of existence shocks the conscience of mankind, …and is contrary to moral law and to the spirit and aims of the United Nations. …

The General Assembly, therefore, affirms that genocide is a crime under international law … whether the crime is committed on religious, racial, political or any other grounds…

(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genocide_definitions, accessed June 17, 2016)

Note that targeting any group for extermination is genocide, whether those groups are targeted based “on religious, racial, political or any other grounds” (emphasis added).  With abortion, the entire human group being denied the right to live is unwanted, preborn children.

Dr. Cox insisted that because he had written a book about genocide, he knows.  I was not impressed with his appeal to authority (a common logical fallacy, to which arrogant college professors are unusually susceptible) and I invited him to google UN Resolution 96.

Perhaps Dr. Cox does not understand the difference between a general definition, which is intended to convey meaning, and a legal definition, which is often written to circumscribe the scope of some law or regulation.

Perhaps Dr. Cox was not aware that the scope of the 1948 Convention was limited to national, ethnical, racial, and religious groups solely for political reasons.  Genocides against social and political groups, for example, were excluded because the Soviet Union feared Stalin’s mass murders might be considered genocidal if broader language were adopted.  (The Study of Mass Murder and Genocide, Robert Gellately and Ben Kiernan, in The Specter of Genocide: Mass Murder in Historical Perspective, Cambridge University Press, 2003, p. 18)

Dr. Cox kept talking about his book, but given his error concerning the UN definition of genocide, I suggested he issue an errata sheet.  A bit provocative, perhaps, but when a belligerent college professor arrogantly asserts a falsehood, he must be held to account.

Professors have tremendous power in the classroom, and they use that power to propagandize the gullible students and bully the rest.  They routinely make appeals to authority (with themselves as the authorities, of course), and students rarely have the knowledge, experience, or courage to expose the professors’ logical fallacies.  We have to be willing to bring them down a notch when they deserve it, and this one did.  Maybe that was my inner Donald Trump coming out.

I should mention that if the preborn are not living human beings, then abortion does not kill humans and there is no relevant similarity between abortion and genocide.  But if the preborn are living human beings — science tells us that they are both alive and human — then abortion kills 1.2 million humans every year in the US alone.  If not genocide, what else would we call it?

Pro-Life On Campus At University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Students study the photos at UNC Charlotte.

Students study the photos at UNC Charlotte.

GAP at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC) is always a special treat for me,  having lived there briefly about 30 years ago.  Both UNCC and the city have grown tremendously; the change is really something to behold.

Like many urban universities, UNCC seems to have a lot of students who actually work as well as go to school.  People with productive jobs are not as susceptible to left-wing kookery.  We had many pleasant encounters with thoughtful students.

On the other hand, one man jumped the barricades to vandalize one of our signs.  He was arrested and is currently facing charges in criminal court.  We got some awesome video.

More to come.

Another former fetus speaks out.

Another former fetus speaks out.  This message was left on our free speech board, which invites students to write comments about GAP and abortion.