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Posts Tagged ‘Genocide Awareness Project’

Gems at University of North Carolina Charlotte, Part 2

CBR volunteer Laurice Baddour stands with a Rwandan man in front of the Rwandan genocide picture.  He gave the display two thumbs up!

CBR volunteer Laurice Baddour stands with a Rwandan man in front of the Rwandan genocide picture.  He gave the display two thumbs up!

Here are some more beautiful gems from GAP at UNC Charlotte.  This is a continuation of Gems at UNC Charlotte, Part 1.

Grandma’s reaction.  An outraged young man shouted, “I want verification of these photos!” We gave him our verification documents. “Oh, that doesn’t count; that information is not from a local doctor!!!” he concluded.  In response, a wise older woman told Jane,  “What idiocy.  That young man is coming from guilt.  Why else all this anger?  I am taking pictures of your photos to show my 18-year-old grandson before he goes off to college.  As Christians, we don’t believe in abortion, but you can hear the word all you want, but hearing is nothing like seeing!  This is real!!”

Making Planned Parenthood decent.  After the young woman signaled her support for abortion at our poll table, Jane engaged her in conversation.  At the end, she concluded, “Let’s just keep PP open on the side that does women’s health care and close down the abortion side!”  Hey, if they just do mammograms, pap smears and adoption referrals, that’s fine by us!

22 years in and she can’t imagine …  “My parents wanted me to abort my baby, but I just couldn’t!”  She recounted how it changed her, made her mature, and made her sacrifice.  Now she has a 22-year-old son and cannot imagine her life without him. “I would love to be here and tell these students that if I can be a teenage mom, anyone can be.  Yes, it made me grow up faster than I wanted, but I wouldn’t trade that experience for anything.  I want so much to tell them not to be afraid.”

A helping hand sees the hope.  Another student chimed in that he has volunteered at a nearby pregnancy resource center.  He has seen many college-age students face the challenge of an unplanned pregnancy with hope and determination, once they hear about the options, services, and programs that can help.  He wanted to get involved with the student group to bring more displays and information to the campus.

Don’t tell them what to do…just make them not want to do it…  A 30-something  man considered abortion evil, but a necessary evil.  He considered killing anything evil but sometimes it had to be done.  He didn’t like our shock tactics.  Jackie explained that our goal is to change public opinion so that abortion was an unthinkable evil for everyone.  The light bulb went off in his head and he suddenly liked what we were doing.  He came from the standpoint that we couldn’t tell people what to do in the laws, but we could inform them so that even if it was legal they wouldn’t want to do it.  [Note: Just to be clear, we want laws against abortion.  As it is with slavery, we want abortion to be unthinkable for civilized people, but we still need to laws that will restrain uncivilized people.]

From pro-abortion to sign me up!  CBR volunteer Laurice Baddour asked a young woman if she was pro-abortion or pro-life.  She responded that she was pro-abortion, however she was willing to listen.  After speaking for no more than 15 minutes, the young woman thoughtfully admitted that she was now pro-life.  Laurice wanted to push the envelope.  Would the young want to get her new pro-life feet wet in the pro-life club on campus?  YES!  And with that Laurice signed her up.  In 15 minutes, a pro-abortion-turned-pro-life student committed to being a pro-life on Campus activist.  [Note:  Not all students who pledge to pro-life activism actually follow through with their commitment.  That is why we are thankful for you, because you make our work possible, not with your words, but with your deeds.  Thank you!]

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Gems at University of North Carolina Charlotte, Part 1

With one press of a button, her social media friends will see the pictures.  Not only that, but probably their friends and their friends’ friends.

With one press of a button, her social media friends will see the pictures.  Not only that, but probably their friends and their friends’ friends.

The University of North Carolina was a deceptively quiet school. There were no huge protest groups and things seemed pretty uneventful.

The one exception was the barricade jumper who spray-painted one of our signs.  (He has since been forced by the Court to pay restitution to CBR.)

We had many, many positive interactions on this campus.  So many, we can’t cover them all in one post!  Here is Part 1.

A day when we won’t come back.  “I met you 6 years ago.  I am glad you guys came back, but I would be glad if you don’t come back again.  That would mean we have ended abortion!” said a young man in a wheelchair with considerable and permanent physical disabilities.

Power of the pictures.  Cody was amazed.  “Wow!  This just amplifies what I believe.  It makes it so much more important, you know, and like, brings it from the back of my mind to the forefront.  Thank you!”

Understanding casual murder.  Angie told Jane that she worked in a hospital lab with “products of conception”—slides made from babies dead in the womb from natural causes.  As she puffed on a cigarette, she lamented, “Seeing this when it’s a casual ‘choice’ is really different.  This is so sad.”

Seeing is believing is outlawing.  Bobby told us, “You see it and it really becomes real.  It makes you think maybe it should not be legal for sure.  So different than I thought.”

If they can get the milk, …  A UNCC administrator came by the display.  She said, “I marched with my parents in the 70’s and I can hardly believe we are still fighting this battle.  My 27-year-old son told me recently, ‘Mom, why do we guys need to get married when the girls give us what we want for free?’  And I say, ‘girls, wake up!’”

She can do anything!  “I was pregnant and thought about abortion for a second.  It did cross my mind.  And I was having some problems with my fiancé at the time, so I talked to my mom.  She said, ‘You can’t do that. You won’t be able to live with yourself.’  So I didn’t.  I stayed in school and had my baby, and things are great with my fiancé now.   Having a baby while in college is not easy, but now I feel like I can do anything.”

More to come.  Stay tuned for Part 2.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Pro-Life on Campus at Old Dominion University

Hampton Roads volunteers came to watch and pray, but it wasn't long before we found them speaking with crowds of students!

Hampton Roads volunteers came to watch and pray, but it wasn’t long before we found them speaking with crowds of students!

A brave student opened the door for GAP at Old Dominion University (ODU), and because of you, we walked in.  Special thanks to Knights of Columbus councils in the Hampton Roads community, who $upported the effort in a big way.  In addition to finances, locals provided housing and meals for our traveling team.

To prepare KOC members and other local supporters for combat in the trenches, we held our Pro-Life Training Academy (PLTA) at the St. Benedict’s Church.  Several PLTA students engaged large groups of students, articulating and defending the pro-life movement like pros!

ODU had about 6 out of 10 moonbats.  Crowds fluctuated throughout each of the days. Towards the end of Day 2, the crowd grew larger and angrier, led by a few very loud students.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Pro-Life on Campus at Virginia Commonwealth University

High moonbat rating but many opportunities to engage students with open minds.

High moonbat rating but many opportunities to engage students with open minds.

We returned to Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) during our Fall 2016 tour.  VCU has the reputation for being the most leftist school in the state of Virginia and it showed. On a scale of 1 to 10 moonbats, this school scored an 8.  (This is a close second to UNC Greensboro, which earned a 9.)

Throughout the first day there were massive crowds around the site.  We hypothesized that they were whipped into a frenzy, with it being Halloween and a week before the election which would, they thought, destroy Constitutional government and forever silence anyone who would dare to question their leftist utopia.

On Day 2, there was a sizable protest group.  They, like their rape-culture-perpetuating counterparts at UNC Chapel Hill, demeaned and degraded women in an effort to get their point across.  Even the cowed males in the protest group held signs that said “Get out of my p****”.

Press coverage:

You can read about our 2012 visit on the FAB here and here.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Hard truths about disgusting acts

The pictures of abortion are disgusting because abortion decapitates and dismembers defenseless human beings.

The pictures of abortion are disgusting because abortion decapitates and dismembers defenseless human beings.

by Jo Litten-Taich

I believe a large part of GAP’s success is in the demeanor and affability of the staff and volunteers.  I know that my simple mission of getting the facts into student’s heads is an attempt to connect in some way with each student.

“So was spreading my legs and having a human life pulled out of me.”

Reading body language was very interesting. It was a high decibel in some instances.  One encounter was with a gal at Appalachian State who was very agitated by the display.  She motioned to the photos and said, “This is disgusting!”

“It is,” I agreed. “So was spreading my legs and having a human life pulled out of me.”  That arrested her for a moment.

I went on to give more personal testimony.  That I’d defended my actions for 10 years until I woke up to the truth about what I’d done.  And that it blew my mind.

She expressed outrage that we were publicly displaying offensive photos and suggested that the internet would be a more appropriate medium.  I asked her how often she’d gone to pro-life sites; I explained that since there’s an information black out about abortion, we bring the truth to campuses where young people come to be informed and challenged.

She skedaddled away in the embrace of a friend.  I hope her emotional reaction results in soul searching.

Jo Litten-Taich is a CBR partner and volunteer in North Carolina.

Mixed nuts at Appalachian State University

Varied reactions to GAP at the rather liberal school in the mountains.

Varied reactions to GAP at the rather leftist school in the mountains.

Random stories from Appalachian State University.

Happy grandparents
“I was in a crisis pregnancy and my parents and the father of my baby wanted me to abort.  I did not.  I have a 2-year-old.  It is hard but…..”  Her voice trailed off.
“And I bet your parents are glad they have a grandchild, aren’t they?” CBR Staffer Jane Bullington replied.
With tears in her eyes, she smiled and said, “Yes”
[Jane makes us all cry sometimes. … but maybe for different reasons.  But we don’t want to get into that.  Anyway, …]

Consumer fraud?
“It is not alive until it comes out the vagina,” a woman told Jane.
Jane responded with a question, “Have you ever seen an ultrasound of a baby in the womb?”
“Yes, and it is not alive.”
“Maybe you missed your high school biology class,” Jane suggested, trying not to laugh.
“I am a biology major and you are stupid!”
Consumer alert: This wannabe scholar should demand a refund from ASU’s Biology Department.  Just sayin’!

More educational malpractice?
“It is an inanimate object only,” a young man said.  Riiiiight.  If this genius ever took a biology class, he too is entitled to a refund.

A functioning conscience.
“This is so awful; I don’t know how people can do this to a child,” a young woman said in tears.

Are you edible?
Some young men in preppy clothing walked by, laughing and goofing off.  “Is that edible?” one of the young men hyucked.
CBR’s Jackie Hawkins replied simply, “No more than you are.”  The goofiness calmed down after that.

GAP under the microscope.
GAP is frequently the subject of classroom discussion.  The teacher of a persuasive writing class reported that his students spent the entire class talking about GAP as an example of persuasive speech.  They discussed not only the display itself, but also the brochure that we hand out.  Even students who would not yet admit to a changed mind had to agree that GAP was an effective use of persuasive argument to communicate its message.  We knew that!

Law and Order
As Jeanette Schultz offered a pamphlet to a professor who was hoofing it passed the display.  Instead of politely declining, the woman snarled in Jeanette’s face, “Get the F*** away from me!”
Although this kind of aggressive behavior is common, but what happened next was not.  Two police officers who were standing nearby seized the woman by her arm and pulled her away from Jeanette, firmly telling her to stop her aggressive behavior and public use of expletives.  That was not how she was to act in public, they said.  The woman calmed down.  When she realized that the police were serious, she made the absurd claim that she “felt threatened” by Jeanette.  The police who had seen the whole thing rejected her claim.  With a stern warning the woman walked away chastened.

Gems at University of Tennessee Knoxvile

A young man describes the inhumanities of his own culture.

A young man describes the inhumanities of his own culture.

by Jacqueline Hawkins

With the massive floods of people passing by the signs at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UTK), the “gem yield” was encouraging.

Pro-aborts actually help
GAP at UT is always fun … by that we mean froth with protest.  The protesters set up just across the sidewalk, which actually pushed the passersby over toward our display as they walked to and from class.  We love it when a plan comes together!

GAP activates the converted
Pro-life students came out of the woodwork to thank us and even help.  Pro-life senior Federico Di Luzio was so impressed that he signed up for the Pro-Life Collegians, attended the meeting that night, and showed up the next morning to help.  Brandon Hambrick was there from the start, with his gentle but strong presence.  Solid as a rock in his Christian faith, he was an example to his male peers.

Sage philosopher
A philosophy teacher was approached by a female student who asked, “I’m holding a petri dish containing an embryo in one hand, and a viable fetus in the other.  Which should I drop?”
The philosopher answered with a question, “Before you stands a man and a woman.  Whom should you murder?”
“Neither,” replied the student.  Dr. Kress answered, “Neither will I murder either of whom is in your hands.”

Phone-a-friend
“Wow. I was pro-choice but I can’t look at this picture without changing my mind. This is a human being.”  The young man phoned three friends and they came to the display. Each one came pro-choice, but each one left saying he had a lot to think about.

Gendercide in Bangladesh
A student reported, “I have never seen these comparisons and they interest me. In Bangladesh, abortion is illegal but I know men force abortions for gender reasons. Men want a son.”

Which is more respectful?
A student asked if our methods were respectful of the dead. CBR’s Jackie Hawkins asked which was less respectful (a) hiding the slaughter of millions while the country cheers and celebrates their demise, or (b) showing their plight so we can mourn their loss and prevent others from suffering the same fate?

Reasonable pro-aborts
Five pro-aborts came to Debbie at the Deeper Still table and told her that while they weren’t on our side, they found that the twerking, condom-pushing protesters were “too aggressive and acting stupid.  They should be willing to talk to you.”

 

 

Sowing seeds at UTK: A Volunteer experience

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Planting seeds of truth and reason.

by Tony Walker

Through GAP at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UTK), we have an opportunity to stimulate dialogue.  Many of those people at first oppose the pictures.  But they are willing to talk if I patiently wait for an opportunity, approach them with a gentle attitude, try to answer their questions and statements with honest and truthful information, and thank them for being willing to be there and take a stand.

Many are openly opposed, but by talking, they give me opportunity to plant seeds of truth and reason that begin to grow a little right then and there.

The opposition will argue that the unborn is not a “living human being.”  But we ask if it is “alive” (not dead or inanimate), and they admit it is alive.  Then we ask if it is “human” (not dog or apple), and they admit it is human.  Then we ask if it is a “being” (not just a human skin or blood cell of the mother), and they admit it is not part of the mother’s body.  They are left admitting the unborn is a “living human being.”

Now what they have left is the question of personhood.  They look at pictures of abuse and murder of Blacks, Indians, Jews, and unborn babies who were denied rights of personhood. They were called less than human, so it was OK to abuse and kill them.  The pictures are powerful and help connect the dots between historical and ongoing inhumanity.

I am thankful to be able to be a part of this graphic outcry.  It would not be possible without the gifts and participation of many workers and givers. I also thank the pro-aborts for being there, thinking and talking about this atrocity.  They bring more attention to the pictures and spark more interest in our message.  That brings out the reporters, who then take pictures and video and share it with many more.

After reading that, don’t you want to get in on the action?  Contact CBR and see how you can be a part of the next GAP trip!

Tony Walker is a CBR volunteer from Tennessee.

Mixed Nuts at East Tennessee State University

Jane Bullington loading up a young woman with materials for her heart-touching homework.

Jane Bullington loading up a young woman with materials for her heart-touching homework.

In it for the money?
“You don’t believe this crap; you just want to provoke someone to hit you so you can sue,” a young man shouted.

Professorial dictatorship
“Professors cut down our grades for questioning or contradicting them.  It is good to see this out here,” a young man told Jane Bullington.

Consistent to the point of silliness
“I truly believe it is not a baby until it is born,” the young woman said.  Jane replied, “What do you see when you look at a friend’s ultrasound and the something is yawning and stretching?”
“It is not a baby.”
Maybe it’s a cat.

Awesome homework fodder
“I have a pro-life presentation in philosophy next week and I need a good argument.”  Jane sent the young woman packing with loads of reading materials.  Her presentation will make a difference.

Not easy, but it’s right
“I am 26 years old and have a child of my own.  We have taken in 4 siblings from foster care too.  It is not easy but it is right,” she told Jane.

On the clock
Kathy, a sociology TA who claimed to be a professor, cussed at volunteer Debbie Picarello, saying we are shaming women.  She admitted to being post-abortive and did not believe that GAP was helping women.  The conversation was laced with “F you” from the woman who was most likely being paid to be there.  A male student was horrified by her behavior.

Making a stand on both fronts
Hally, a Christian student, said she was convicted about being out at the display.  Her first thoughts had been about self-preservation but realized God wanted her there.  She took a class taught by the Sociology TA who showed a pro-homosexuality film in class.  Hally was publicly ridiculed by the teacher and the students for sharing a perspective outside what the professor had presented.

Struggling with the past
Volunteer Christy McKinney spoke to a student and mom of three.  She was 31 weeks pregnant with her 3rd.  Her 2nd child was 7.  Her 1st was aborted.  She had never seen the pictures and stopped to look at them.  She was struck at how developed the child was in the 8-week abortion and looked at it for awhile.  Her parents wanted the abortion.  Looking back, she believes it was the “right choice for her.”  While she said those words, Christy could tell that she was struggling to make herself believe it.

Gems at North Carolina State University

Wisdom from pain shared with CBR’s Jane Bullington and Jacqueline Hawkins.

A couple share wisdom from pain with CBR’s Jane Bullington and Jacqueline Hawkins.

by Jacqueline Hawkins

Despite the mayonnaise a pro-abort student smeared over one of our signs, there were some real gems that appeared throughout the two days we brought GAP to North Carolina State University.

Chastity and purity.  A young black woman told Jane she and her boyfriend have mutually agreed their bodies belong to the Lord, and their physical relationship will comprise only hand-holding until marriage.  She has turned down many Christian young men as dating partners because they could not see anything wrong with kissing and whatever that led to.

Hard, but softened by friends.  A male and female student were sitting near the display.  Jane watched them for a couple of minutes and thought she saw them praying.  Jane walked over and asked if they had questions or comments.  She asked if they had, indeed, been praying for us.  “Yes, we were.  We are here to spread Jesus on our campus and we wanted to pray for you guys.”  The young woman’s last comment was, “Being a Christian is the hardest thing I have ever done.”  It is, but it is made easier by praying friends.

No choices for her.  “I am a single mom. I have a 13-year-old and a 2-year-old.  When I got pregnant 3 years ago, as an educated, upwardly mobile black woman with tenure on this campus, I got no support for my decision to keep my baby.  Two different faculty members asked me, ‘Can I take you to get it taken care of?’ and ‘What are you going to do with it?’  There was no ‘choice’ for me unless my choice was theirs as well.”

Spared from gendercide.  A student from India told the story of his very blessed mother.  “My mom grew up in a rural village in India where baby girls were thrown down into a well in order to kill them.  My mom was spared because our family had a little more money apparently.  She used to play by that well.  She didn’t know until she was an adult who was inside.  Years later, an Indian man, educated in America where he also made a lot of money, returned to that small village and built a school just for girls.  Times are changing in rural India but it is slow.”  He pointed to the pictures and said, “This is horrible as well.”

Grab-n-go info.  “So what if the woman is raped?” asked a male student.  CBR volunteer acknowledged the horror of rape and gave our standard answer.  “OK, what if the woman’s life is in danger?”  Patti answered with our script about having two patients [mother and child] that we may or may not be able to save.  “Got it! Thanks”  He kept moving.  No argument!  No questioning my sources!  No extreme examples and exceptions!  He made Patti’s day!

Wisdom through pain.  Jane and I spoke to a very nice married couple when they came by during their lunch break.  They thanked us for being there.  “People need to see this,” the husband said.  He was a librarian at the NC State library.  The wife had an abortion years ago, after her daughter was diagnosed with a disease.  Her daughter would have been in her late teens by now.  Now the couple has trouble conceiving.  The wife sagely asserted that you never know what the future holds.  You need to treasure the children you are blessed with now, regardless of your situation, because you may not be able to have more in the future.  This is especially true after an abortion.  We directed the wife to the Deeper Still table to learn more about post abortion counseling and retreats.  They were good people that God will hopefully bless with more children one day.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Diary of a black pro-life missionary

Black students seem to find me. Not sure why!

Black students seem to find me (behind the barricade, on the left).  Not sure why!

by Jacqueline Hawkins

I have written about the intersection of race and pro-life activism (here and here).  Because I am a “black sheep” of the black community, I am often confronted with responses that my counterparts don’t experience.

Sometimes black students treat me differently.  Some might feel more comfortable talking to me — or unleashing their wrath, as the case may be.  Perhaps some take liberties with me they can’t take with others.  The treatment at UNC Greensboro was especially intense.

Token black girl.  Some black girls accused me of being the token black person on the team.  They argued that this somehow made my presence invalid.  They even said I should be offended that my white counterparts would have me participate in GAP.  (Is there anything black people shouldn’t be offended by?)  I said I have two degrees in the predominantly white field of agriculture.  I asked if it would have been better to drop out of college because my field of study didn’t have enough black folks.  They didn’t have much of an answer.

BET PSA.  “I don’t feel like my voice is being heard!” a black female student shouted at the top of her lungs.  I felt like I was listening to a BET public service announcement during an election year.  Of course, this could have been said by anyone, black or white — I heard the same thing on MTV.  Speaking of catchy PSAs of the millenial generation, another black girl said, “You don’t have a right to make us feel uncomfortable!”  I need a safe space; are there any no-stupid zones?

Guilt Backfired.  Some black students told me, “You should be standing up for the choices of black women!”  I replied, “I rather stand up for the black children marked for slaughter.”  They didn’t have much of a response to that one either.

Return to the school yard.  In the late afternoon, right before we broke down, some black students came to me and insisted that this method doesn’t work.  They told me that no one cares.  I made a sweeping gesture to the huge crowd of students, most of whom had been there since noon.  I said all this attention only brings more and more attention.  People do indeed care.  They persisted.  I told them about Martin Luther King and how our process was modeled off of his actions.  Boy, they didn’t like that; they were attacked by loud, forceful belly laughs.  Reminded me of middle school.  “Whatever, Martin Luther,” they jibed, eyes rolling like marbles.  They left as they continued to laugh and mock me.

Making demands.  As we were breaking down, the belly-laughter students came back and demanded I talk to them.  When I told them I had to help break down they scoffed and rolled their eyes, insisting I could talk to them but just didn’t want to.  Again, I was reminded of middle school, when the black kids would make demands of me and get upset when I didn’t give in.  I politely assured them that we would talk again when CBR came back to UNCG.  To that they said: “We don’t want you back!”  In turn I replied, “Don’t worry, we’ll be back.”  I winked at them to seal the deal.

Just a reminder, I can only keep my promise with your help.  Please do help me go back.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

The curious case of Egg Boy

Egg Boy’s arguments may have been weird, but thankfully, he didn’t look like this.

Egg Boy’s arguments may have been weird, but thankfully, he didn’t look like this.

by Jacqueline Hawkins

We don’t know his name … so we’ll just call him Egg Boy (not to be confused with Humpty Dumpty).  At NC State, Egg Boy tried to champion the pro-abortion cause with a raw egg.

“I tell you, chemically speaking, there is no difference between this 2-week-old chicken fetus and a 2-week-old human fetus,” he declared resolutely, again and again.

In his hand was an unfertilized chicken egg (not even a chick-in-a-shell), so it was hard to figure out just what his vehement, triumphantly-stated argument was.

So I finally had to tell him and his approving friends, “Sir, at the end of the day, that chicken fetus will grow up, have it’s head chopped off, turned into chicken tenders, and served at the Chick-fil-A right over there.  Meanwhile, the human fetus will grow up, become a student at NC State, and eat the former chicken fetus-turned-tenders.  Does that answer your question?”

With that, Mr. Egg Boy scratched his head and looked dubiously at his visual aid.  “I don’t know … I’m not really sure why I have this anymore …”  At least he was honest.

Egg Boy was stumped.  But, if at first you don’t succeed, …

So Egg Boy took his visual aid and tried again.  He was so confident that his new angle would deliver a glorious victory, he brought his own camera(phone) man.  He would be a YouTube star!

Holding up the egg, he asked CBR volunteer Patti Shanley, “Can you eat this human fetus?”

“That’s not a human fetus; that’s a chicken egg.”  Patti is pretty smart for a pro-lifer.

“How do you know this isn’t a fetus?  Wouldn’t you have to open it up and kill it to find out?”  The phone was brought closer and closer, to record the overwhelming domination of this intellectual giant over the mentally-deficient pro-life bigot.

“Seriously?  You’re a student at NC State and you are asking me if this chicken egg could possibly be a human fetus?  Is that the best you have?  I’m disappointed.”

“But, but, couldn’t this be a fetus?” he insisted.

“No, it couldn’t, but I think you should take it to the agriculture school and ask someone over there.  I’d love to see the look on that professor’s face when you ask.”

Foiled again!  “Stop recording!” Egg Boy commanded.

With that, he slinked away.  We actually saw Egg Boy the next day.  He rode by on his skateboard … no egg and no arguments.

He is actually smarter than many of his peers.  He at least knew his argument had been beaten.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Two post-abortion stories: one denial and one confession

Young women speak with one who is older and wiser. Thank you for making her work possible.

Young women speak with one who is older and wiser.  Thank you for making Debbie’s work possible.

by Jacqueline Hawkins

A UNC Greensboro student walked up to the Deeper Still (DS) post-abortion counseling table.  She told Debbie Picarello that seeing the pictures had “completely undone any healing that I had accomplished until now.”

As Debbie asked probing questions, the young woman said she believed her child would be reincarnated.  She reasoned that because of the abortion, she could now help more people, that she was better off, and so on.

This student wound up sharing her justifications with a small group of like-minded female students who had gathered around.  They were adamant that Debbie’s approval of the pictures was hurting women.  They told Debbie she really didn’t care about them.

But Debbie stood her ground.  She said healing comes through Jesus Christ alone.  In her words, “Acknowledgment that we murdered our children is essential to being forgiven, because that is how God sees what we did.  Our opinions are trumped by His Truth.”  Amid much scorn and scoffing, another female student opened up.

Holding back tears, Jackie said she had been raped by a police officer and had an abortion.  Debbie expressed her deep sorrow for the young woman, and came out from behind the table to speak with her privately.  She asked if she could hug Jackie and the young woman cried even more.  The angry, mocking group of girls became silent.  Debbie took Jackie off to speak privately.

Jackie is a Christian,  Debbie pressed a Deeper Still pamphlet into her hands.  Looking her in the eye, Debbie told the young woman that she believed her child is in heaven and holds absolutely no unforgiveness towards her.  Her baby looks forward to the day when they will be reunited.  The girl allowed Debbie to pray with her.  Afterwards, Debbie encouraged her to get help as soon as possible for the rape and the abortion.  Jackie’s did not have to carry these burdens by herself; she could find healing through Lord Jesus.

Debbie hopes to see her someday at a Deeper Still healing retreat.  Debbie sewed the seeds — and so did you, because your support made this encounter possible — and now we pray for God to bring the fruit.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Mixed nuts at UNC Greensboro

Firestorm at UNC Greensboro

At UNC Greensboro, reactions ranged from furious, to calm, to … kind of weird.

by Jacqueline Hawkins

As you can read here, the response to GAP at UNC Greensboro was quite animated.  CBR Project Director Lincoln Brandenburg said that many of the students were like hyenas descending upon a scrap of meat.  Between the bloodthirsty vitriol and the stealth appreciation, there was a wide range of reactions.

The man who almost wasn’t
Based on his expression and the way he spoke, it was obvious he wasn’t out for blood like his schoolmates in the crowd.  He made neutral inquiries concerning the life of the mother.  I gently answered his question, mentioning cases such as toxemia and ectopic pregnancies.  I made sure to stress to him and those listening that saving the life of the mother did not involve Planned Parenthood and ripping children apart.  It was a matter of administering medical treatment to BOTH patients.  Unfortunately, in the case of ectopic pregnancy, saving the child is impossible, given current medical technologies.  Satisfied with my answer, he then told me he was almost an ectopic pregnancy.  He had implanted very close to the fallopian tube.  I told him just how happy I was he had survived and was there to speak with me.  He thanked me and disappeared into the crowd.

Maternal instinct
A young woman walked by, just as Bill offered a pamphlet.  “I’m pregnant!  I don’t want to see this!” she exclaimed.  She was determined but not antagonistic.  She didn’t want to see pictures of what she could have had done to her own child.  “I’m not doing this!  I’m keeping my baby!”  This young woman already had a healthy level of maternal instinct.  The pictures will help her to encourage the same instincts in her friends and family.

Best argument on campus
The grand prize for best pro-abortion argument goes to the young man who came to within 6 inches of Jane Bullington’s face and shouted, “You are STUPID.”  Jane stood toe-to-toe and eye-to-eye with this learned scholar until he backed off and went to make his prize-winning argument with someone else.

Enlightened pro-abort musings
At the height of the rowdiness, four young women from a protest group came over to Jane Bullington to talk.  They had the usual lack of knowledge that facilitated the usual objections.  But because they were somewhat open to what Jane had to say, they were able to learn a few things they hadn’t known before.  At the end, one girl mused, “It is sad that we don’t have discussions when we have difference of opinions.  We shouldn’t just try to shout people down when we could talk to them.”  Amen to that.

Selling out for consistency
A young black man walked up and asked pointedly, “Why?  Why are you doing this?” After answering him, he reasoned that since people are going to have abortions anyway, there was no reason to try to stop them.  I applied his argument to slavery.  “Would you want them legalize slavery because people are going to traffic humans anyway?”  He shrugged nonchalantly, musing that when push comes to shove, legalizing crimes that already happen wouldn’t be such a bad thing, even if it meant he got shipped off to the nearest cotton field.

Post-liberal dictatorship?
A male student was a pro-abort, but he was by no means pleased with his fellow students. As they demanded GAP leave campus, he exploded.  “F*** all of you!  As liberals, if we can’t defend free speech of those who disagree with us, then liberalism is dead!”  He stormed off continuing to curse at the protesters,  “Are we trying to live in a post-liberal dictatorship?”  Umm, yeah.  We kind of are.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Post-abortion counseling on campus

Deeper Still’s Debbie Picarello in action at UNCG.

Deeper Still’s Debbie Picarello at UNC Greensboro.

by Debbie Picarello

When I set up the Deeper Still post-abortion counseling table near the Genocide Awareness Project (GAP), students always ask if I am part of GAP.  They are often angry about the abortion photos and don’t want to speak with GAP volunteers.

I always give the long answer, “I am here with Deeper Still, which is a post abortion healing ministry.  We offer free healing retreats for men and women.  Yes, men hurt from abortion too.  And (pointing to the pictures) we are hurting because we have done that to our children.”

I am also repeatedly asked about the pictures angering or upsetting post-abortive women.  I explain how being upset at the pictures is a telltale sign that something is still wrong.  I point out that healing and counseling is a emotional and messy process.  I always encourage hurting people to seek help.  I say to women and men that if the pictures still cause them extreme distress, it’s a sign they still need healing.  When asked if these pictures “trigger” me now, I say they do not.  That is a product of healing.  They are hard to look at, but not triggering.

The Fall 2015 GAP tour was especially evangelistic.  I was repeatedly asked about Deeper Still being Christian.  I say that the only lasting healing from the wounds of abortion come through Jesus Christ alone.  Over and over again, I have shared miraculous stories of healing and deliverance from the Lord Jesus at these campuses.

Are you a post-abortive person who has found healing?  We need you!  Come with us and reach out to students in a way that only you can.

Debbie Picarello is a post-abortion counselor with Deeper Still, an international post-abortion counseling ministry based in Knoxville.