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Posts Tagged ‘ETSU’

Mixed Nuts at East Tennessee State University

Jane Bullington loading up a young woman with materials for her heart-touching homework.

Jane Bullington loading up a young woman with materials for her heart-touching homework.

In it for the money?
“You don’t believe this crap; you just want to provoke someone to hit you so you can sue,” a young man shouted.

Professorial dictatorship
“Professors cut down our grades for questioning or contradicting them.  It is good to see this out here,” a young man told Jane Bullington.

Consistent to the point of silliness
“I truly believe it is not a baby until it is born,” the young woman said.  Jane replied, “What do you see when you look at a friend’s ultrasound and the something is yawning and stretching?”
“It is not a baby.”
Maybe it’s a cat.

Awesome homework fodder
“I have a pro-life presentation in philosophy next week and I need a good argument.”  Jane sent the young woman packing with loads of reading materials.  Her presentation will make a difference.

Not easy, but it’s right
“I am 26 years old and have a child of my own.  We have taken in 4 siblings from foster care too.  It is not easy but it is right,” she told Jane.

On the clock
Kathy, a sociology TA who claimed to be a professor, cussed at volunteer Debbie Picarello, saying we are shaming women.  She admitted to being post-abortive and did not believe that GAP was helping women.  The conversation was laced with “F you” from the woman who was most likely being paid to be there.  A male student was horrified by her behavior.

Making a stand on both fronts
Hally, a Christian student, said she was convicted about being out at the display.  Her first thoughts had been about self-preservation but realized God wanted her there.  She took a class taught by the Sociology TA who showed a pro-homosexuality film in class.  Hally was publicly ridiculed by the teacher and the students for sharing a perspective outside what the professor had presented.

Struggling with the past
Volunteer Christy McKinney spoke to a student and mom of three.  She was 31 weeks pregnant with her 3rd.  Her 2nd child was 7.  Her 1st was aborted.  She had never seen the pictures and stopped to look at them.  She was struck at how developed the child was in the 8-week abortion and looked at it for awhile.  Her parents wanted the abortion.  Looking back, she believes it was the “right choice for her.”  While she said those words, Christy could tell that she was struggling to make herself believe it.

Pro-Life on Campus at East Tennessee State University

Jane Bullington speaking with an inquisitive student at East Tennessee State University.

Jane Bullington explains that abortion decapitates and dismembers its preborn victims.

by Jacqueline Hawkins

It had been 4 years since we visited East Tennessee State University (ETSU).  In 2012, it was a successful Choice Chain.  This time, it was our full Genocide Awareness Project (GAP).  We couldn’t think of a better way to spend Holy Week than work to save the “least of these brothers and sisters” of our Lord (Matthew 25:40).

One young pro-life woman was emboldened by our presence and went head to head with a pro-abort teacher’s assistant (TA).  The TA had brought her class to watch her confront and defeat (she hoped) CBR’s Fletcher Armstrong in a battle of wits.  Unfortunately for this poor TA, she came to the battle unarmed.

The pro-life student was a senior with a husband and daughter.  She knew a lot more about life than the typical college student.  It was awesome to see her in action, using her life-experience to confront the selfish naive notions of those who really didn’t understand the glories of motherhood.

At the end of the second day two students held protest signs in their lap as they lounged on the steps of the library.  They offered no compelling argument to justify decapitating and dismembering little human beings.  If somebody could only offer such an argument, it would save us all a lot of trouble.

It was a successful two days.  Things didn’t get too rowdy, so it was a perfect school to warm up for the more intense encounters to come.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Pro Life on Campus at East Tennessee State University (ETSU)

Abortion photos help students see what "choice" really means.

Abortion photos help students see what "choice" really means.

CBR organized a Choice Chain at East Tennessee State University (ETSU) last week.  Jane Bullington and Renee Weber from Knoxville met up with Mick and Edie Hunt from Asheville at the Borchauck Plaza on the ETSU campus for a day of pro-life outreach.  Hand-held “Choice” signs show passersby what “choice” really means (a dead baby) and draw a crowd.  We handed out hundreds of our “Unmasking Choice” brochures and spoke with students all day long.

It was a beautiful day; students continually crossed the Plaza.  Some saw and quickly turned their heads.  They were trying to ignore the reality of abortion, but it didn’t work … a glance is enough.  Others wanted to talk.  No matter how big or small the exhibit, the debate is always the same.

Chelsey was so upset, she whimpered that she is pro-life, has not had an abortion, but wanted us to know that we were “doing this the wrong way, in case no one has ever told you.”  (If Chelsey only knew!)  Chelsey is studying to be a counselor and she is sure abortion photos will traumatize women … that women will not be able to recover from seeing them.  She didn’t seem to realize that women won’t recover from the abortion unless something compels them to repentance.  Chelsey may not have had an abortion herself, but it was apparent that someone in her life has been personally affected by abortion.

Three young women were passionate about educating their fellow students and gave us their contact information, so we may help them continue the battle on campus … including more Choice Chains and the Genocide Awareness Project (GAP).

A class was coming across the lawn when the teacher spotted the signs.  They were high achievers, very polite, and very interested in what we were doing.

Jane speaks to University High School honor students.

Jane speaks to high school honor students; the photo tells a story her words never could.