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Posts Tagged ‘All Black Lives Matter’

International reactions to ALL Black Lives Matter

Will the future leaders of foreign nations help us if we get to the point that we can't help ourselves?

Will the future leaders of foreign nations, influenced by the American pro-life movement, help us if we get to the point that we can’t help ourselves?

by Patti Shanley

The international population at Purdue is one of the largest at any university in this country.  The students who saw GAP will return home with more than a degree.

Sad Song.  Song, from China, struggled to put into English her reaction to the horrifying pictures of tiny, aborted babies.

“Is real?” she wanted to know.  She knew about forced abortion in her homeland, but this was the first time she had actually seen abortion.  She experienced that crucial moment of cognitive dissonance when truth shatters through a long-held belief.  With her head shaking, fighting back tears, all she could say was “No!  No!  No!”

Unimaginable and unbelievable.  “This is not legal in this country, yes?”  Two international students were having a hard time believing abortion is available on demand, without any reason.  He could only stare, and she was almost in tears.   I explained the importance of graphic images in reform movements, and that we want people to see the horror of abortion so they will never accept injustice as a choice.  The students had heard of forced abortions in their own country, but could not imagine voluntary abortions.  When I told them there were about 3,300 each day, the young woman cried out in disbelief.

Disgusting.  Reactions from other international students were similar, and after three days at Purdue, it was painfully clear that this country is in trouble.  Although students from other countries were shocked and disgusted at seeing the truth, American students and faculty called us “disgusting” for showing the truth.  They tried to defend decapitating and dismembering tiny, innocent human beings.  “You people are disgusting,” one faculty member hissed as she walked by.  No, abortion is disgusting.

Patti Shanley is a CBR partner and volunteer from Raleigh, North Carolina.

Diary of a black pro-lifer: Loud activists and quiet sponges

Black students quietly absorb the message.

Black students quietly absorb the message.

by Jacqueline Hawkins

There seem to be two groups of black students who come to see our ALL Black Lives Matter (ABLM) signs, the Black Lives Matter (BLM) activists and the I’m-just-here-to-get-my-education (IJHTGME) students.

The BLM activist students lose their minds, but the IJHTGME students absorb ABLM like parched sponges.

When BLM students see us use their slogans to expose their own hypocrisy, they blow a gasket.  At Purdue University, the BLM students (mostly women) pulled out all the stops, trading in their dignity to become out-of-control, stereotypical caricatures of black women.  There was wild neck rolling, finger wagging, fist shaking, and nearly unintelligible shrieking and cursing.

According to one of the BLM students, only white people could be racist because they had power; black people had no power so they couldn’t be racist, only prejudiced. Armed with their own delusions, they spewed putrid racism for all their peers to see (and cower from).

BLM students are used to behaving like this with anyone and everyone.  They do this because it usually works to get them their way.  But it doesn’t work with us, and before long, they tire out.  The shrill screaming and wild body movements gets exhausting.  They lose their voices.  They get cricks in their necks.

But despite all the theatrics, the giant display is still there, exposing abortion and the damage it does to Black community.

So they disappear, and in their places come the quiet sponges, many of whom readily accept the comparison of abortion with Jim Crow and slavery.  They are shocked to learn about the racist origins of Planned Parenthood and the way PP is suppressing the Black vote.  Not everyone is convinced, but most are willing to listen with open minds, and for that we praise God.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

ALL Black Lives Matter at the Ohio State University Law School

Pastor Childress waiting for the Law School Deans to come out for some dialog.

Pastor Clenard Childress waited in vain for law school deans and black student activists to come out  and defend their threats against Madison Gesiotto.

by Jacqueline Hawkins

We hoped the Ohio State University (OSU) Law School Dean would pick on somebody his own size.  He dared not do it.  Instead, he cowered in his office.

It all started when OSU law student (and Miss Ohio USA 2014) Madison Gesiotto wrote a compelling article in the Washington Times entitled, “The number one killer of black Americans.”  That killer is abortion.

To some of her peers, this was more than they could tolerate.  A few black students were enraged that a white woman would write about black abortion.  A white student threatened violence.  Concerned about her safety, Gesiotto went to OSU law school deans to seek counsel and help in addressing the potential danger.

But instead of helping her, the deans persecuted her for expressing disfavored opinions, even making thinly-veiled threats to sabotage her career.  Read more here and here.

The OSU Law School may not care to defend Gesiotto, but CBR will.  To push back against bullying, CBR took its ALL Black Lives Matter (ABLM) campaign to the Law School’s front door.  ABLM is a variation of of our Genocide Awareness Project that focuses on abortion in the Black community.

The ABLM display doesn’t pull punches. One panel features a Confederate battle flag, along with the question, “Which is more hateful, evil done to us, or evil done by us?” Another explains how Planned Parenthood suppresses the Black vote more than the KKK ever could.

Some black students did not want Gesiotto to speak because of her skin color, but we took that canard off the table by teaming with Black pro-lifers from the Life Education and Resource Network (LEARN).

We invited deans and members of the Black Law Students Association to come out and defend their threats and bullying.  Of course, none of them showed up.

It was a great day.  Gesiotto later told us that our presence had made an important contribution to free speech at OSU.  Students who had been neutral on abortion (which is another way of being pro-abortion) were now reconsidering their view.  Furthermore, pro-life students who had been afraid to express disfavored viewpoints were now finding the courage to speak up.

This is a lesson for all of us.  The best response to bullies is to stand up to them.

BTW, don’t let anyone tell you that pro-lifers are just a bunch of old white men and brainwashed housewives.  We come in all flavors.  One of us is an ice-skating law student that moonlights as a beauty queen and writes for the Washington Times!

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

ALL Black Lives Matter at Purdue University

The flier that started it all. It's a true statement, but it lacks undeniable evidence to back it up.

The flier that started it all. It’s a true statement, but it lacks undeniable evidence to back it up.

by Jacqueline Hawkins

A group of scrappy, industrious pro-life students did their own ALL Black Lives Matter campaign at Purdue.  In February, the Purdue Students for Life (PSFL) posted fliers that focused on abortion in the black community.  Their intentions were in the right place, but their fliers stated opinions instead of facts (though their message was completely truthful).  There was an intense and vicious backlash from radical elements of the student body.  There were even Facebook attacks from a Purdue staff member.

We went to Purdue to convey three messages:

  1. ALL Black Lives Matter, including every preborn child.
  2. Every abortion is a savage act of violence.
  3. Leftist pro-aborts don’t get to decide who may speak, nor what may be said.

Pastor Clenard Childress and his Life Education and Resource Network (LEARN) helped us create a racially diverse team, ready and willing to take on all comers.

The first day was filled with turmoil.  Several BLM activists resorted to hysteric theatrics to make their point, only to make themselves look like ridiculous caricatures.  It was hard for them to play the race card with so many blacks behind the barricades.  On the second day, the BLM activists disappeared, but a small group of LGBTWXYZers protested.  Or maybe they were LGBTTQQFAGPBDSMers — not too sure about that.  Anyway, …

They laid out blankets on the grass and lounged about the whole day.  No chants, no jeers, just lounging.  By the third day, most of the crazies had disappeared.  Except for one angry, loud student, we were visited by a diverse array of inquisitive, thoughtful, and calm students.

The PSFL were amazing.  There were smart, bold, and strong.  They had been knocked down, but instead of cowering in the closet, they regrouped, strategized, and came out swinging for the sake of children — specifically black children.  They worked together as a team and welcomed collaboration.  At CBR, we oppose human cloning, but in the case of PSFL, we might make an exception!

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Pro-aborts can’t censor or intimidate us at Purdue University.

Pro-aborts can’t censor or intimidate us at Purdue University.

ALL Black Lives Matter at the University of Missouri

LEARN and CBR team with All Black Lives Matter signs at the University of Missouri.

LEARN and CBR team with ALL Black Lives Matter signs at the University of Missouri.

by Jacqueline Hawkins

The University of Missouri (Mizzou) was recently the epicenter of campus unrest nationally, primarily among the African American student population, but also including others who have felt offended for whatever reason.  The protests at Mizzou were an extension of the “Black Lives Matter” campaign that erupted after a law enforcement officer in Ferguson, Missouri was not indicted for defending his own life against a violent criminal.

At Mizzou, there were unproven allegations of racial slurs.  There were complaints about so-called “microagressions,” which may be loosely defined as any statement whatsoever that could somehow be twisted as potentially offensive to anybody.  Campus administrators were excoriated for failing to respond quickly and decisively enough to these offenses.  They failed, for example, to set up “safe places” for blacks only (a policy once known as segregation).  As a result, the Mizzou President and Chancellor were both forced to step down.

Many conservatives tried to keep a low profile, for fear of being accused of who-knows-what, but not CBR.  We teamed with the Life Education and Resource Network (LEARN), an African American pro-life ministry, to remind students at Mizzou that ALL black lives matter, not just the particular black lives that fit a certain leftist narrative.

Our “ALL Black Lives Matter” campaign, a derivative of our Genocide Awareness Project (GAP), shows students that while they have been standing against injustices that may or may not exist, a huge, can’t-deny-it’s-there injustice has been going on right under their noses — most of the time, with their explicit approval.

On the third day, a sizable protest took place, with students displaying “I stand with Planned Parenthood” posters and engaging in clownish behavior typical of college pro-abort protesters.

Media Coverage:

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

All Black Lives Matter at Fayetteville State University

CBR Project Director Jackie Hawkins explains how abortion is the leading cause of death in the Black community

At Fayetteville State U, CBR Project Director Jackie Hawkins explains how abortion is the leading cause of death (and voter suppression) in the Black community.

We need the Black community.  Without them, we cannot win.  And who better to advocate against pervasive injustice?

That is why we were thrilled when the Life Education And Resource Center (LEARN) brought our Genocide Awareness Project (GAP) to Fayetteville State University (FSU) in North Carolina, one of many historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) who need to see that all Black lives matter.  It was our first visit to this school.

See CBR’s new All Black Lives Matter signs and press release here.

“I saw so many being enlightened, some weeping, and others willfully joining our opening and closing prayers. The dialogue was transforming.”  (LEARN National Director Johnny Hunter)

One group of students said they even watched part of Maafa 21 in class, because of our presence on campus.

Media Coverage:

“CBR has always been burdened by the fact that the abortion rate in the African American community remains tragically high. Black women account for 36% of all abortions despite constituting only 11% of the female population.”  (CBR Executive Director Gregg Cunningham)

For more details, read this letter from Gregg Cunningham explaining the All Black Lives Matter Initiative.

Kudos to CBR Maryland Operations Director Samantha Linnemann for making this event possible by bringing equipment and personnel to Fayetteville and managing the site.