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Archive for the ‘Campus Debate (GAP)’ Category

Pro-Life on Campus at Western Kentucky University

Speak to a witch and get demons, or speak to a GAPer and save your child from slaughter.

Pro-Life on Campus brought GAP to Western Kentucky University for a second time. We went to WKU back in 2015.

We give it a rating of 3 out of 10 moonbats.  Most of the students were calm and ready for thoughtful dialogue.  Nearby, a witch set up a table to provide the alternative view on abortion.

We also ran our Reproductive Choice Campaign (RCC) truck around campus.

The press coverage related more to the RCC truck, but we’ll take it:

 

Hope and healing at Tennessee Tech

Letter on our Free Speech Board, written to Paiten and Jesse by a sister who misses them deeply.

by Debbie Picarello

At Tennessee Tech, Angie (not her real name) wrote a note to her two siblings, both aborted years ago (photo at right).

Angie learned about them when her mother went to work at a CPC, and through that experience, told Angie about the children she had aborted years ago.

Angie was crushed by the news.  She had always begged her mom for a sibling.  At some point, the siblings were named Paiten and Jesse.  Angie has even written letters to them.  She looks forward to meeting them in heaven.

I gave Angie a Deeper Still pamphlet.

Just a few days later, a post-abortive woman came to one of our Deeper Still healing retreats.  A few weeks after that, this same woman attended a Deeper Still training seminar.  We wound up in the same sharing group, and I heard this woman tell her story.  It sounded so familiar.

This woman was none other than Angie’s mother!

It was one of the most beautiful God surprises I’ve had to this day!  God certainly knows how to connect people!  Thank you, CBR supporters, for making this encounter possible!  Angie’s Mom will now help other women heal from their abortions!

Debbie Picarello volunteers with CBR and with Deeper Still, a post-abortion healing ministry.

Pro-Life On Campus at Murray State University

CBR volunteer Brian McKinney teaches young men to step up and protect the innocent.

Pro-Life on Campus brought GAP back to Murray State University in Kentucky after a long absence.  Not many moonbats in that part of Kentucky; we give it a rating of 1 moonbat on our scale of 1 to 10.

Throughout the calm two days, there was only one protester with a “clever” sign that read, “Abortion is fine, but condoms are less expensive and homosexuality is a fine choice too!” However, he was notably respectful and had honest questions about God, the Bible, and politics. Unfortunately, though, he was unable to maintain a thought to its completion, so rational dialogue was difficult.

His inability to complete thoughts (and perhaps think critically) may have lead to these statements he made to the Murray State News:

“I walked by and saw it and I despise the flawed reasoning that is used on these signs … I believe that their imagery especially is deceptive.  It’s an attempted emotional appeal.  People are allowed to believe what they want, I don’t think I’m changing people’s minds,” he said said. “The most I’ve done is that I’ve gave out a bunch of condoms.  So, hey, I might’ve just kept a baby from being aborted, which is more than what these people have been doing all day.”

These would be laughable, except for his encouragement of irresponsible, child-like adults to engage in high-risk behavior.

Press coverage:

Pro-Life on Campus at East Tennessee State University

CBR’s Joanna discusses prenatal development and abortion.

CBR made another visit to East Tennessee State University (ETSU).  A lot more lively this time.

We give it a moonbat rating of 5 out of 10 moonbats, compared with 1.5 out of 10 moonbats on our last visit.  Schools with a moderate amount of moonbats keep things interesting.

The trip included a pro-abortion protest group with the usual fare of regurgitated slogans with little-to-no substance on poorly made signs.

Press coverage of our trip includes two articles by the East Tennessean Online. The first article surprisingly included pictures of the whole display with abortion pictures included.  Articles:

 

Pro-Life on Campus: Double Feature at University of Tennessee Knoxville

Bullies use bed sheets to oppress the rights of ideological minorities.

CBR brought the Genocide Awareness Project (GAP) to the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UTK), not just once, but twice, in the Spring semester!

UTK earned this exclusive double feature thanks to its unlawful interference with our free-speech rights and those of our student hosts, the UTK Pro-Life Collegians. Encouraged by virulent Trump Derangement Syndrome tactics in other parts of the country, a small group of students held up colorful fabric barriers to block our signs.

We insisted that these banners be removed, but UTK took a cue from other schools that nurture left-wing violence through institutional passivity. They allowed this childish and unlawful behavior to continue. As a result, the bullies thought they had won.

But not so fast! This ain’t our first rodeo, and we have many tools at our disposal.

Immediately, we brought out our hand-held Choice signs and stood in front of the bullies.

Next, we planned our return trip for later that semester. This is exactly what we did at the U at Buffalo in 2014. The Buffalo administration sided with the bullies, so we sued them for civil rights violations. After a year of trying to defend the indefensible, Buffalo got religion and restrained the law-breakers on our return trip.

We informed UTK of our intention to seek a legal remedy if they allowed their students to veto speech rights again.  That seemed to do the trick.

On our return trip, the fabric barriers were nowhere to be found.  According to rumor, UTK warned the bullies of disciplinary action if they erected their barriers. UTK officials even established a 20-ft buffer zone around the display and prevented any student from holding a sign within that buffer.

Yes, it was some trouble to stand up to bullies, but as Thomas Jefferson (or somebody) said, “Eternal vigilance is the price we pay for liberty.”

Thank you for standing up to bullies with your $upport!  And make no mistake, your $upport makes all of this possible.  Without you, the bullies win.  Click here and don’t let the bullies win!

Press Coverage:

Unblocked

Uncensored. Bullies lose.

 

Diary of a black pro-lifer — Earning my blackness

Black students accuse black pro-lifer of being on the plantation because she did not adhere to the thoughts assigned to her by the black community.

Black students accuse black pro-lifer of being on the plantation because she did not adhere to the thoughts assigned to her by the black community.

by Jacqueline Hawkins

At the Old Dominion University (ODU) GAP, a group of irate black female students berated our newest staff member Joanna Keilson for being white, blatantly airing their putrid racism for all to see.

“You white!  You got yo white husband and yo privilege and yo big house!”  The only thing they really got right was the color of her skin.

I stepped in, and they turned their anger towards me.  Much of what they said was unintelligible; I don’t speak Ebonics very well.  However, every now and then, some of the insults came through.  There was talk of Trump and my being enslaved.

I was called a “nigga” and a “bitch”.  This might seem harsh, but in the black community these words are bandied about frequently, often in friendly terms.  People refer to their enemies, acquaintances, and friends this way.  They even refer to their children this way.

One of them said, “You’re beautiful.  You look like an African queen with your locks, your earrings and your skirt, but you ain’t black!  You ain’t black!”

She then became hysterical, a caricature screaming in my face, an unintelligible tirade, complete with wild gestures and facial expressions.  Pretty much done with the parody she had morphed into, I moved onto talk with more reasonable students.

But let’s go back to that interesting statement she made in regards to my genetic profile.  “You ain’t black.”  I’m not?  Oh dear.  You mean I haven’t earned the color of my skin?  Whatever do I have to do to earn my coco brown flesh?  Blame white people for everything?  See racism in every single aspect of society?

Hmm … let’s narrow this declaration down to the context of the situation, but expand its implication. “You ain’t black” she said, because I was standing behind the barricade with the pictures of dead children, along with my white co-workers.

What do I have to do to earn my blackness?  Support the sexual revolution on steroids in the black community, where we mate and breed like animals?  Where we see that behavior as normal, going as far as to say that marriage really isn’t for black folks?  Mindlessly listen to and applaud music by top black “artists” who promote a life of debauchery in premarital sex, drugs, violence, and the abject objectification of women (particularly black women)?

How can I be truly black?  Encourage black women to kill their children at a proportionately higher and faster rate than any other race in the country?  Accept the demise of the same black community through the barbaric sacrifice of its innocent children?  And then settle for the over 70% of black children who were actually allowed to live to be shot in the foot by being born into illegitimacy?  Settle for these children being set up for, at the very least, a childhood fraught with poverty, youth violence on the streets, drugs, and the plethora of problems that arises from daddy issues and broken homes?

Oh, I’m so sorry that I do not support the rampant debauchery in the black community.  I’m so sorry that I expect more from and promote and work to return the black community back to the strong Christian entity that it was.

Once upon a time, we had intact families.  We carved out lives for ourselves without the help of the government.  We were upstanding citizens, even when the country didn’t consider us citizens.  We had fathers!

Excuse me for not believing in the racist notion that my thoughts should be assigned to me purely because of the color of my skin.  Forgive me for believing that black people should be held to a Christian standard–the standard that our ancestors fought for the freedom to adequately live by.

If this makes me not truly black, then I’ll just have to live with the color of my skin being no more than that–a phenotypic trait.

Jacqueline Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Gems at Old Dominion University

Based on facts and not false assumptions, ODU students can have a rational debate about abortion.  Without the facts, as horrific as they are, rational debate is impossible.

We judged Old Dominion University (ODU) to be “moderate” on the moonbat scale, earning 6 moonbats on a scale of 1 to 10.  There were a lot of great conversations, but without the same kind of acrimony that we saw at Virginia Commonwealth University that same week.  However, things did get a bit heated by the end of the second day.

She knows all too well.  A pregnant woman and her husband are seeking asylum in America.  She was so glad to see GAP.  A strong woman who knows a thing or two about life, she will fight against injustice for anyone, regardless of race or religion.  She soberly confirmed our rape sign.  She lamented fact that fathers kill their daughters and their grandchildren, but they ignore the rapists.  She told us that although abortion is not allowed in the Muslim religion, it is allowed in the Muslim culture.

Rampant bloodshed.  A Saudi Arabian man found it very hard to believe our lax abortion laws.  Abortion happens in his homeland, but (he believes) not as frequently as it happens in America.  He is against abortion regardless of the country.

Never again.  A young woman angrily marched up to Maggie Egger.  “These pictures are very upsetting to the students!” she shouted.

Maggie responded, “How can a picture of abortion be upsetting, if the act of abortion is not?”

The young woman calmed a bit and told Maggie that she was post-abortive.  “I would never do that again,” she declared resolutely.

God speaks.  Ivy, a Christian young woman, thought that if she became pregnant as a teenager, she would have an abortion.  She theorized that God would approve.

While her words were still in her mouth, a young man swooped in and exclaimed, “Thank you!  My mom had me at 16, and if she had had an abortion, I would not be here.”  It was obvious that God had given His Word on the matter.

Mission Accomplished!  A member of the wrestling team exclaimed, “You changed my mind!  Mission accomplished!”  He thought he had gotten a girl pregnant years ago and had considered abortion.  Now after seeing the pictures, he was open to speaking to teammates who are sexually active or have paid for abortions.  He would help his teammates stand up and do the right thing, even if it was difficult.

Vote pro-life!  Roy was about 50 years old.  He was ex-military, a railroad worker, and a corrections officer.  A tough guy.  “Thank you!  This needs to be seen and we can only hope it affects voting.”  Amen!

Chickens, sin, and indoctrination

Jane Bullington speaks with a young woman about the culture of sin and self-destruction.

by Jacqueline Hawkins

A PETA woman (or wannabe) screeched at us, “You don’t care about the millions of chickens raised in horrible conditions, just to be slaughtered, but you care about this!!!”

Before you could say “Chick-fil-A, but hold the pickle, please,” another young woman walked over.  She didn’t much care for the PETA woman.  “I just want to hit her in the face!!” she exclaimed.  CBR does not advocate violence, but we understand the young woman’s frustration.

A mother of two, she was 100% against abortion, and then some.  She lost her virginity at 15 because, although her parents were good Catholics, the message of sexual purity just didn’t come through.  Or at least it didn’t come through strongly enough to overcome the culture of death.

She was angry that schools indoctrinate students with sin and self-destruction.  The worst example is telling young children, “Let me show you how to put a condom on a banana so you can have safe sex.”  The seeds of destruction find fertile ground among naïve children with adult bodies and wild hormones.

Jackie Hawkins is a CBR Project Director and a regular FAB contributor.

Mixed nuts at Old Dominion University

He definitely looks like someone who is ready to give an account at the Pearly Gates. …  Just sayin’.

College students say the nuttiest things.

Christian for Choice.  A young “Christian” man held a clever sign that said: “Christian for Choice.”  Have fun explaining that at the pearly gates…

Changing the subject.  A woman shrieked about our omission of the Native American genocide. “Why don’t you have pictures of that genocide!?!?”  Jane calmly directed her to our photo Wounded Knee photo.

Upon receiving exactly what she asked for, she changed the subject, but not her tone.  She came closer and closer to Jane, until they almost touched noses.  Jane, not deterred by a petulant child, did not flinch or step back.

The student continued to shriek about the 100 million Native Americans who should be acknowledged.  “Abortion is NOT genocide like THAT is genocide!”

She got louder and louder until she finally stopped and left.  She never acknowledged that we actually do recognize Native American genocide. Perhaps it never really matter to her in the first place.

Passionately apathetic.  “F*** you people” a young man hissed at GAP staffers.  “And f*** you people too!” he growled at the protesters.  Like Billy Martin in those Miller Lite commercials in the 1970s and 80s, he feels strongly both ways.

Can’t handle the truth.  An ODU events manager sat nearby and fielded complaints from angry students.  Jane suggested that ODU teach a Constitutional law class to freshmen.  The lady replied wearily, “I am seeing that the students don’t know how to deal with opposing opinions in the culture of this campus.”  Ya think?!

Belligerence tamed by a story of heartbreak

Belligerent “White Trash” humanized by a story of heartbreak.

by John Stair

On the first day, we had a man dressed in a Halloween costume stalking around the pictures, yelling at us, with intense profanities and vulgarities in a fake New York accent.  The accent conveniently changed when he was stopped by the police for getting physical with a pro-life student.  His costume was a white garbage can, his hat was the lid.  We think the costume was intended to mock us as “white trash.”

On our second day at VCU, the suit was gone but he was even more belligerent.  He stalked a couple of our group who had tried to talk with him, but he only wanted to berate us for being there.  We told him they would not respond to yelling, but he only got louder.  He accusing us of not wanting to talk.

The protester yelled at me from a distance and asked me if I would speak with him.  I told him I would not, until we was willing to listen to what I had to say.  He said he would, so I walked over and told him I could have a better conversation if we stood closer together.  We were now about 4 feet apart, and I asked if I could tell him why we were there.

I shared the horrible experience of a miscarriage of my 3rd child, in our bedroom and into the toilet.  I told him about taking the tiny body to the hospital and giving the body over to the hospital personnel.  Years later, I realized they had just thrown that baby into the trash and I regretted not giving my child a proper burial.  I told him that CBR photos of a 10-week fetus in the womb are what I held in my hands after the miscarriage.

I told him about CBR staff—people of integrity, people with college educations, people who would never display photos that could not withstand intense scrutiny.  I encouraged him to investigate on his own as well.  He had some comments, but his response was much more muted and diminished, thanks to the Holy Spirit.  He hung around the display for a while longer, but he never yelled at or berated one of us again.

John Stair is a CBR Southeast Project Director.

Mixed nuts at Virginia Commonwealth University

Men in pink shirts and strange socks thought they would frighten us, but we are not that easy to scare.

More from Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU).

Stooping low out of respect?  A student complained, “I just wish you could present this so as not to disrespect liberal students and maybe they would listen.  And maybe find common ground.”

Hmmmm.  Looking at the crowed of half-naked, cursing, sex-crazed snowflakes, we wonder what they would consider “respectful.”

Kill ’em, cause I don’t want ’em.  A middle-age maintenance man took issue with the genocide comparison.  Not because he had an argument, but because he didn’t want to take care of his own children.  “Are you going to take in all those kids that live?  I’m not.”

A young man admitted that abortion is murdering a child, but he would still do it.

Demonic.  A young man came up to the poll table and voted that abortion should remain legal.  He wrote, “I worship Satan and I think abortion is great.”

Whom do you fear?  “I thought we scared them off, to be honest,” a male Planned Parenthood operative said when we showed up for Day 2 (3 days after Day 1).  Yeah, right.  Men in pink shirts holding “I stand with Planned Parenthood signs” are much less scary than God’s judgment on a nation that sacrifices its children to Molech.

Regrets.  We ran into a handful of people who were vocal about their regrets.  A woman had an abortion via plan B regretted it deeply. She started crying.  CBR staffer Jane Bullington tried to comfort her and told her that there was forgiveness in Jesus.

Standing up to bullies.  When he was 22, his girlfriend aborted his child against his wishes.  After that, he studied the facts and changed from pro-choice to pro-life.  He stood in front of the GAP display and engaged students for an entire day.  He was spit upon and harassed by “pro-choice” students, but he held his ground.

Gems at Virginia Commonwealth University

Jane speaks with a young man who became pro-life the hard way — his girlfriend aborted their baby.

Jane speaks with a young man who became pro-life the hard way — his girlfriend aborted their baby.

The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness cannot overcome it.  (John 1:5)

Joyful.  An Asian freshman female said in a soft whisper, “I wanted to tell you that I am pro-life and that I am very joyful that you have come to our campus.  I pray for you and wanted you to know that not all the students here are like these protesters.”

Grateful but curious.  A Muslim woman was thankful about our sign comparing abortion to honor killings, but she was very curious about  how we even knew about this ugly part of the Muslim culture.  Honor killings are largely ignored here because the leftist media see Muslims as a force against Christianity, and they hate Christianity more than they love women.

An open mind.  Referring to the ill-mannered protesters, one student commented, “I consider myself pro-choice, but calling people names and demeaning others is not respectful. It’s not the way to get your point across.  When we leave this campus, we will meet people with different opinions.  This is not the way to discuss differences.”  Yeah, he’s pro-choice now, but he’d better watch out, because God can work with an open mind.

Defining “choice.”  Another student commented, “I understand they want choice, but if they watched a child being ripped apart and screaming in the womb, they couldn’t want this.”  Wisdom.

Rebellion against God.  Another student commented, “Abortion is just rebellion against God, and the government assists.”  More wisdom.

So right.  Student 1 complained, “Don’t you think this is too extreme?  Couldn’t you guys just set up a tent and invite people in or set up a table and not be in people’s faces so much?”  But Student 2 had greater insight, “No, man. If they did that, we wouldn’t be having this conversation right now.”

Gems at Tennessee Tech University

CBR Southeast Director Fletcher Armstrong speaks with students at Tennessee Tech.

CBR Southeast Director Fletcher Armstrong speaks with students at Tennessee Tech.

The new Centennial Plaza is a beautiful new venue at Tennessee Tech.  While there, we dug up a few gems to share.  (Don’t worry; no bricks were harmed in the mining of these gems!)

Appropriate response.  A female history major commented, “I have seen GAP a couple of times.”  When asked how she responded the first time she saw the pictures, she replied, “I went to the bathroom and threw up.”

Ready for battle.  An engineering student remarked, “We may have different views on the subject, but I appreciate that we can sit here and have a civil conversation about this. You are clearly passionate and well informed.”  Indeed.

Happy.  A male student welcomed us.  “I’m glad you are here. People say it is too graphic, but it is what it is.  People need to see it.”

Please help us do more.  Click here.

Angry.  Three female students, at different times during the day, said essentially the same thing.  “This breaks my heart and I get so mad when my friends don’t get it.  How can they not see it?”

Sad, but bold.  A female student in a medical major spoke of her brother’s child, who was aborted by his girlfriend aborted without his knowledge.  She said, “I could have been an aunt. And that relationship between them is also over.”  She took a photo of GAP and said, “I’ll post this on Facebook and see how many friends I lose!”

Selfish couple.  She tried to argue against the humanity of the unborn human child.  When that failed, she said, “Why should I have to carry a baby I don’t want, just so I can give it away by adoption?”

He didn’t say much.  As long as he can get sex without responsibility, why should he care?

Civil.  Student Carl said, “I really appreciate that I can sit here and have a civil discussion with you even if I’m pro-choice and you are pro-life.”

Barely alive.  A male engineering student said, “My mom was raised Muslim and became pregnant with me right before she and my father divorced.  Her family wanted her to abort me, but she chose to give me life.  It is so eye opening to see these images and think of how easily that could have been me.  My life was decided by a yes or no question.”

Another close call.  A female history student remarked, “I have a niece who is almost a year old, and she is my whole world.  I look at these images and think about how that was her just a little while ago.  How could someone destroy something so precious?”

Rape victim shares her story

Kelly Hicks speaking with young women about the painful truth of abortion.

Kelly Hicks was discussing the question of rape with two female students at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU), when another young woman overheard and interrupted.  She wanted to talk.  Normally, Kelly would ask her to wait her turn, but something moved Kelly to give the young woman the floor.

She cried as she told everyone that she was raped in 8th grade.  It was very traumatic.  Then she described going through with the pregnancy and choosing adoption for her child.  Already bold, GAP strengthened and inspired her to do a school project on abortion.  She wanted to reach out to victims like herself.

As you might imagine, everyone within earshot was speechless.

Mixed nuts at Middle Tennessee State University

Stop the genocide of Harambe.

“Stop the genocide of Harambe.”

A few of our more disturbing encounters at Middle Tennessee State.

A slave to sodomy.  A very polite young man made a shocking admission.  Because of his sexual encounters with multiple men, he said, “I go to Planned Parenthood 2 or 3 times per month for STD testing.”  To speak with us, he skipped class and endured not a small amount of hazing from, we assume, some of his sexual enslavers.  Rejecting their manipulation, he stayed with us for an hour.  Please pray for this young man.  Very sad.

Science jumps the shark.  He said the preborn is not human because it doesn’t have a soul.  “I have researched this extensively and written papers on it; I know for a fact when the fetus gets a soul.”  Jane told him, very nicely, as only Jane can do, that he was full of baloney.

Better off in the human chop shop.  A young woman became more and more belligerent as she talked.   She was sure that

  • late term abortions are done because the mother is going to die,
  • women are making thoughtful, deliberate decisions when they abort,
  • the 8-week skeleton does not show differentiated cells, and
  • no one wants to adopt, and if these babies are not aborted, millions will be in the broken system.




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